Spring Cleaning and Reawakening

The principle of Wu Hsing describes the flow of Qi and the balance of Yin and Yang.  According to this principle, all change in the universe (macrocosm) and in your body (microcosm), occurs in five distinct phases.  Each of these phases is associated with a particular time of year, a specific phase of energy in nature, and specific organs in your body.  Change links together all aspects of nature, the seasons of the year, and your body’s organs and bodily processes. A practitioner of Ba Gua Zhang links together the state of the Qi whether stable, in excess, or in deficiency, to get an idea for physical, energetic and mental progression.  This includes specific movements, breathing and meditation practices, specific foods and herbs, acupuncture or acupressure and body work to restore and balance the state of Yin/Yang and Qi.      

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Application of San Bao (Three Treasures) to the Warm-Up Exercises

Our Warm-Up Exercises should be done before every workout and serve several crucial functions.  On the level of Jing (physical matter or essence), the Warm-Ups warm and prepare the body’s tendons and ligaments for movement, thus preventing pulled muscles and injury.  In terms of qi, these exercises directly engage not only the Zhang Fu meridians, but also activate the Qi Jing Ba Mai, or Eight Extraordinary meridians.  On the level of xin (heartmind, consciousness, or spirit) the Warm-Ups will sharpen the practitioner’s focus and direct intention where it is needed for each exercise.  All three levels of these San Bao or “Three Treasures” must be cultivated over years of practice in order to perform the Warm-Ups correctly.  While these movements may seem simple, they are in fact a very powerful set of Qigong.  When one becomes skilled in the Warm-Up set, it becomes a continuous and graceful form unto itself.  

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